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Published: Mar 03 2018

How to Make Healthcare Technology Management a Strategic Asset – Part 3

By Al Gresch

Parts 1 and 2 of this series discussed 6 other best practices for using data and process to create value and recognition for your HTM department.

How to Make Healthcare Technology Management a Strategic Asset – Part 1
How to Make Healthcare Technology Management a Strategic Asset – Part 2

7. Third party service management.

Deploy and document an automated contract management system to centralize and rationalize service contracts, proactively flag equipment under service contracts, alert managers to pending contract expiration, and automate the documentation and performance of vendors against their SLAs.

Upload contracts to asset records along with key contract information:
  • Automate management of expiration dates.
  • Map service contracts to assets.
  • Create dashboards and reports to track vendor SLA compliance.
  • Develop and implement standard processes and procedures for contract management.
  • Rationalize contracts to identify opportunities to consolidate/eliminate contracts and vendors.
  • Integrate with a major vendor CMMS to provide real-time work order updates and to eliminate manual data entry.

8. Environment of care (EOC) rounding.

Deploy and document an automated, closed-loop system for assigning, distributing and completing EOC surveys, including any corrective, follow-up tasks that must be performed, with the objective of improving compliance, simplifying reporting, and reducing the time required to manage and fulfill EOC rounding requirements.

Implement interactive surveys:
  • Automate assignment and distribution of surveys.
  • Automate corrective action assignment, distribution and tracking.
  • Create dashboards and reports for monitoring EOC KPIs and reporting for audits.
  • Design and document a closed-loop process for managing rounds and addressing any documented issues.

9. Interoperability & automation.

Deploy and document interfaces between systems and equipment to extend automation and deliver higher levels of service and improve productivity.

Implement an interface with the Building Automation System(s) (BAS) to automate the creation, assignment and distribution of work orders from triggered alarm points:
  • Implement an interface with Recall alerting system to automate the creation, assignment and distribution of work orders from recall notifications.
  • Implement an interface with PeopleSoft, Lawson, etc. to automatically send purchase requests to PeopleSoft, send purchase order (PO) updates and information to the CMMS, and automatically notify the worker upon receipt.
  • Design workflow and document policies and procedures for the BAS alarm points interface.
  • Design workflow and document policies and procedures for the recall/alert interface.
  • Design workflow and document policies and procedures for the PeopleSoft procurement interface.
  • Equipment integration.
  • Helpdesk integration.
  • EMR/ADT integration.
  • Materials Management integration.

10. Enterprise performance management.

Define key performance indicators (KPIs) and build real-time dashboards and reports for all stakeholders to create a culture of accountability by improving visibility and communication across the organization; meet with stakeholders quarterly to review progress and identify areas for improvement.

Design and implement customized dashboards and reports to track KPIs across staff levels, locations and sites:
  • Incorporate internal and external performance benchmarks.
  • Meet regularly and consistently with staff and executive leadership to review KPIs.
  • Review best practices progress and prioritize initiatives to drive continual improvement.
  • Provide ongoing training sessions.

In healthcare technology management, you are asked to support important decisions about resources, budget, and equipment.

You must be able to:
  • justify additional resources and increases to your operating budget.
  • determine if existing equipment should be replaced with new equipment, or if you need to increase the amount of equipment.
  • decide what type of equipment to purchase so that you are not stuck with subpar equipment that is difficult and expensive to maintain, unreliable, or has user issues (e.g., NPFs).

Fundamentally, your HTM program must provide a basic level of technology services and comply with applicable standards and regulations. More established HTM programs must move beyond the basics to provide additional services with a focus on cost-effectiveness. Advanced HTM programs must demonstrate the full range of potential for HTM contributions to patient care. While few programs can achieve this level of performance across the board, you still can find opportunities for continuous improvement, even at this level, according to AAMI's 2nd Edition of the HTM Levels Guide.

Read How to Make Healthcare Technology Management a Strategic Asset – Part 1
Read How to Make Healthcare Technology Management a Strategic Asset – Part 2

Accruent - Blog Post - How to Make Healthcare Technology Management a Strategic Asset – Part 2

Approved for 1 CEU by ACI

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